Here is the 2012 annual report for  Screw Pile Developments!

Screwpile Developments got about 8,000 views in 2012, however since starting this site back in July, there have now been over 23,000 dropbox downloads via the SPEX!

The most popular files have been Building Prop 1 (1782 downloads) and Building Prop 2 (1420 downloads).

So a huge thank you to all those who have visited, clicked and downloaded…

Click here to see the complete report.

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A plume of smoke emanating from a fissure. Photo / Supplied

Photo / GNS Science

Fears of an eruption are now at their highest since August.

White Island is continuing to produce “vigorous bursts” of mud, rock steam and gas up to 100m high and larger explosions including molten sulphur are possible, say experts.

The seismic activity, which has lasted several days, poses a greater than usual risk to visitors, said GNS Science.

Scientists monitoring the island volcano in the Bay of Plenty say the crater lake is drying out and the frequent bursts of mud, steam and gas were still vigorous.

Past monitoring of the island showed new eruptions often develop from this type of activity and small muddy lakes sometimes form in craters “as the unrest develops geysering and explosions occur through these lakes, becoming more vigorous with time”.

[Read More – New Zealand Herald]

Mt Taranaki, as seen from space. Photo / Twitter

A NASA astronaut has today tweeted out a picture of Mt Taranaki as seen from the International Space Station.

Thomas H. Marshburn, who has just over 12,000 followers on Twitter, sent a message at about 12:45pm New Zealand time.

“More volcano-spotting! Mt. Taranaki on New Zealand’s North Island served as the backdrop in the movie The Last Samurai,” he said.

The photo shows a clear view of the 2518-metre-high mountain, with the Taranaki coastline seen to the west.

Mt Taranaki is known as one of the most symmetrical volcanic cones in the world and, because of its resemblance to Mount Fuji, was used at the backdrop for The Last Samurai.

[Read More – New Zealand Herald]

Te Maari Crater eruption on Mt Tongariro. Photo / Ben Fraser

The steam and super-heated gases which have been pouring from the side of Mt Tongariro since its two surprise eruptions last year are set to be a feature of the volcano for years.

And nearly two months since Mt Tongariro last blew, GNS volcanologists say there’s every chance of another sudden eruption, just as at neighbouring Mt Ruapehu and White Island to the north.

[Read More – New Zealand Herald]

Volcano watch

White Island
This week downgraded from alert level two to one (out of five). A recently-established lava dome has stopped growing, but scientists say a column of magma not far beneath still poses a threat.

Mt Ruapehu
Remains at alert level one with an exclusion zone around the summit. A suspected blockage below the crater lake may be causing a gas build up that could result in sudden eruption.

Mt Tongariro
Remains at alert level one with part of the Tongariro Alpine Crossing closed. Emitting large amounts of gas and sulphur dioxide and scientists still expect a repeat of the last eruption in November.

The eruption of Ruapehu, June 1996.

Just like Mt Tongariro’s surprise bang on Wednesday afternoon, what happened a few kilometres away at 8.20pm on September 25, 2007, came suddenly and violently.

Shortly before airline pilots noticed a black plume rising above Mt Ruapehu, a volcanic blast threw ash, rocks and water across the summit area, sending two muddy torrents down the skifields.

Inside a hut on the edge of the crater lake, William Pike and James Christie heard a “massive boom” before the building’s door was blown from its hinges and mud and rock poured inside. Mr Pike’s crushed leg later had to be amputated.

The warning signs Mt Ruapehu gave in the days before that explosive moment are being seen again now – worrying scientists that the mountain could be about to produce a similar-sized eruption.

GNS volcanologist Michael Rosenberg said Mt Ruapehu has been showing two forms of unrest, which are considered unrelated.

There have been 45 earthquakes about 5km beneath the mountain since early August, but 35 of those have come in the past month.

[Read More – NZ-Herald]

 

Source – NZ Herald

Raw Video – Tongariro Eruption

Video – Intermediate School Teacher Talks about being close to eruption

Timelapsed footage of the November 21 Mt Tongariro eruption

 

 

Image  —  Posted: 22 November, 2012 in New Zealand News
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The Te Maari crater at 1.30pm today. Photo / Geonet

The Te Maari crater at 1.30pm today. Photo / Geonet

Mount Tongariro has erupted, GNS Science reports.

The eruption came from Te Maari Crater, on the western side of the mountain, shortly before 1.30pm.

A massive plume of ash can be seen coming from the mountain.

GNS Science duty volcanologist Nico Fournier told APNZ the eruption happened about 1.20pm.

“There was one eruption, essentially one explosion, and it was not sustained. It spewed some ash possibly a couple of kilometres up the air. The ash is now drifting to the east-southeast.”

Dr Fournier said the eruption was not very loud and was smaller than an earlier eruption in August.

Tongariro, in the centre of the North Island, erupted in August for the first time in 115 years, sending ash as far east as Napier.

According to GeoNet, Tongariro is a complex of multiple volcanic cones constructed over a period of 275,000 years.

The mountain’s active vents include Te Maari, Emerald, North Crater and Red Crater.

Last week GNS Science increased the likelihood of neighbouring volcano Mt Ruapehu erupting, following increased activity on the mountain.

Read More – nzherald.co.nz

The last eruption at Mt Ruapehu was in 2007. It was also thought to have been caused by a build-up of pressure beneath crater lake. Photo / Nicola Topping

Scientists are warning there are heightened signs of volcanic activity at Mt Ruapehu and an eruption could be just weeks away.

GNS Science experts say pressure is building up in the crater lake at the volcano and there is now a high risk of an eruption.

Volcanologist Steven Sherburn said: “We think that the temperature a few hundred metres beneath crater lake is about 800C, but the lake itself is only about 20C.

“This suggests the vent is partly blocked, which may be leading to a pressure build-up beneath crater lake. A sudden release of the pressure may lead to an eruption.”

[Read More – NZ Herald]

 

 

The blackened crater of Mt Ruapehu after it erupted in 2007. Photo / John Cowpland

The blackened crater of Mt Ruapehu after it erupted in 2007. Photo / John Cowpland

 

The likelihood of Mt Ruapehu erupting has increased, GNS Science says.

GNS Science duty volcanologist Steven Sherburn said changes in measurements at Ruapehu over the last few weeks indicate eruptions are “more likely over the next weeks to months”.

“We are monitoring Ruapehu closely, but it often does not give any immediate warning that it is going to erupt,” Dr Sherburn said.

“We think that the temperature a few hundred metres beneath Crater Lake is about 800 degrees Celsius, but the lake itself is only about 20 degrees Celsius. This suggests the vent is partly blocked which may be leading to a pressure build-up beneath Crater Lake.

“A sudden release of the pressure may lead to an eruption.”

As a result, the Aviation Colour Code has increased from Green to Yellow. However, the Volcanic Alert Level remains at 1. Code Yellow indicates a volcano is experiencing signs of elevated unrest above known background levels.

GNS said small earthquakes have been occurring about 5km beneath the summit area of Ruapehu since late-October, but these may not be directly related to the high temperatures beneath Crater Lake as the earthquakes are much deeper.

A build-up of pressure beneath Crater Lake is thought to have caused the 2007 eruption and a smaller eruption in 2006.

Source – nzherald.co.nz

Kiwis On Mars

Posted: 3 October, 2012 in New Zealand News, Space
Tags: , , ,

Kiwis on Mars: This shot was taken by the Nasa rover, Curiosity.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/sideswipe/news/article.cfm?c_id=702&objectid=10837931